Former WWE star opens up on Chris Benoit



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Former WWE star opens up on Chris Benoit

Chris Benoit was one of the most crystalline talents to ever set foot on a WWE ring, having literally captivated wrestling fans with his exquisite technique and magnetic personality. The former Canadian superstar would have had a guaranteed place in the Hall of Fame without the tragic events of 2007, which made him one of the most discussed and criticized characters in the history of this business.

The two-time world champion killed himself on June 25 14 years ago, not before killing his wife Nancy and son Daniel. A tragedy that caused a huge sensation in every corner of the globe, raising a wide debate regarding the physical and psychological damage to a long-term athlete.

In a lengthy interview with Sportskeeda, former WWE wrestler Kevin Thorn recalled his intense work experience with Benoit. According to 'Cagematch', Kevin was Chris' last opponent on a live show before the tragic events we have just described.

Chris Benoit is a strange figure for the WWE

"I have worked with Chris Benoit for a very long time and I cannot deny that it was a fantastic experience" - admitted Thorn. "We went out there and tore each other apart in some live shows.

I remember those moments perfectly, I had a multitude of bruises in every part of my body due to the intensity we put on. Those bruises stayed with me for a large number of weeks, they were a sort of reminder looking back today” - he said.

Although his stint as Mordecai didn't last long in SmackDown, Thorn still performs occasionally for the pleasure of entertaining the crowd. “I get into the ring from time to time. There are some promoters that I really like and have always had a great connection with.

They are part of my ranks of close friends if you know what I mean. It's not work, it's pure fun. I don't mind having to stay there for a long time, it's like it's a holiday with friends”. Chris Benoit is a strange figure for the WWE and professional wrestling community to look back on.

On one hand, he was an inspiration. The Rabid Wolverine had an old school work ethic and a perfectionist’s edge. He demanded excellence out of himself and his opponents, worked out like a fiend, and honed his skills by travelling the world to assimilate key pieces of a variety of styles of wrestling. It looked as though he might have a glass ceiling overhead as he emerged into the mainstream American wrestling scene.