Dutch Mantell on how much does politics affect WWE wrestling?



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Dutch Mantell on how much does politics affect WWE wrestling?

Dutch Mantell joined WWE in the mid-1990s, using the nickname 'Uncle Zebakiah' He is best known for managing the Blu Brothers and a young JBL during his first tenure in the Stamford-based company. Following his departure from WWE in 1996, Dutch has partnered with several federations, including TNA.

During that time, he played a fundamental role as a writer and was one of the architects of the 'Knockouts' division. He later returned to WWE as Zeb Colter, helping numerous young wrestlers breakthrough in this business.

Cesaro, Jack Swagger and even Alberto Del Rio are still very grateful to him today, having managed to fully express their talent thanks to his support. During the latest edition of 'Smack Talk' on Sportskeeda, Mantell analyzed the episode of SmackDown that aired on Friday night.

Dutch took advantage of this opportunity to emphasize how politics backstage affects the fate of various athletes.

WWE: Dutch Mantell on politics in wrestling

“Why are Usos so successful in WWE? Are they the strongest ever? It is clear that the family they come from has played a role in their ascent.

They would deny it, but it is no mystery that they are privileged. Nia Jax and Tamina also come to mind, who joined WWE the same way. Professional wrestling is imbued with a strong political component, which has always existed.

In recent years, this aspect has perhaps become even more obvious,” said Mantell. Dutch Mantell then commented on Charlotte Flair's situation: “In the ring, she is continuing to do an excellent job, we certainly do not discover her talent today.

I don't like her promos, I have to be honest. They are too similar to those of her father Ric. Do you remember the 'Woo' and all the rest? I didn't like it even when he did it. Those times are now over, Charlotte should show people a more original style”.

Adora is a United States Army veteran. She spent eight years in the military and served in Afghanistan. However, she later decided to leave service and pursue a wrestling career. "While I was [in the Army] I had these moments where I was faced with the decision where I was like, 'All right, either I’m going to re-sign up and do this for the rest of my life, or I’m going to try out wrestling and do that for the rest of my life.'

It wouldn’t be fair to me if I didn’t at least explore what wrestling was," she told the Washington Post.