Vince Russo talks about Bret Hart



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Vince Russo talks about Bret Hart

The 'Montreal Screwjob' is undoubtedly one of the most controversial episodes in WWE history. The facts are well known to fans and we still continue to discuss the various background that led to that sensational event.

Bret Hart, who had already struck a deal with WCW, was preparing to face Shawn Michaels at the 1997 Survivor Series. The Canadian superstar did not want to lose that match due to the hatred he had created with HBK both in and out of the ring.

Fearing that Hart might show up in WCW with the WWE Championship, WWE boss Vince McMahon tricked 'The Hitman' and made Shawn win. Bret made his WCW debut in December 1997, about a month after the Montreal Screwjob. In May 1999, his brother Owen tragically died of a fall during his entry into the ring in the 'Over the Edge' PPV.

In a recent interview with Sportskeeda, former WWE and WCW writer Vince Russo expressed his displeasure with the way Bret was treated.

Vince Russo opens up on Bret Hart

"The story relating to the Screwjob in Montreal still gives me a huge annoyance, given that the WWE has clearly disrespected a legend like Bret Hart" - began Vince Russo.

"I don't think Bret ever really got over that event. He always said he succeeded, but I'm not so convinced. He has had a gigantic impact on the rest of his career. They gave him a terrible blow” - he added. Russo launched yet another jab at Vince McMahon: "My 90-year-old father is in better shape than Vince McMahon, I can guarantee it.

I don't understand why Vince insists on not understanding that his time is over. He is no longer able to appear on television or run shows from behind the scenes. When I spoke to Vince over the past few months, I had a special feeling.

It is as if he does not notice the time that passes, he thinks he is still 50 years old." Former WWE commentator and executive Jim Ross believes Bret Hart was just as good as The Undertaker at being a locker room leader.

Speaking on his Grilling JR podcast, Ross discussed Hart’s backstage influence on other members of the WWE locker room: “He was an amazing locker room leader, much like The Undertaker, and sometimes administration’s not aware of the close relationships that a guy has, and those individuals’ influence on young talent,” he said.

Bret Hart’s WWE accomplishments were recognized in 2006 when he received his first Hall of Fame induction. In 2019, he became a two-time Hall of Famer when The Hart Foundation (Bret Hart and Jim Neidhart) also joined the Hall of Fame.