Paul London on John Laurinaitis and his case: He talks a lot of sh*t



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Paul London on John Laurinaitis and his case: He talks a lot of sh*t

There is a lot of confusion in WWE right now after Vince McMahon left the company. This was preceded by accusations against McMahon. However, such things do not happen for the first time. Former WWE Head of Talent Relations John Laurinaitis was under similar accusations.

Paul London and Rene Dupree talked a little more about it in one of the episodes "Cafe de Rene" “I met him at WCW,” London said as quoted by Wrestling Inc. “He was if I remember correctly – he was head of talent at WCW, the very same position he was in at WWE.

And Dory Funk Jr. had arranged for myself and a few of the other standouts of the Funkin Conservatory to do some backstage stuff. When you’re that new and you’re kind of wide-eyed in the back of a big company’s locker room for the first time, you don’t really allow yourself to become too opinionated, because you’re too paranoid about pissing anybody off.

But he didn’t really seem to change too much from when I started working with him in WWE."

Paul London Laurinaitis and his attitude

Laurinaitis had a special attitude and sometimes he was rude. Laurinaitis had principles that he adhered to and was a part of this organization in its greatest rise.

“He always kind of struck me as that dad who used to be an athlete but is now his kid’s coach, but he talks a lot of sh*t and he acts like a ‘been there, done that’ kind of guy. And to his credit, he was during a lot of the peak times, with like the Dynamic Dudes and what not, even though I always thought Shane Douglas was the better worker of the two.

I never delved into his stuff in Japan. I can’t say he ever pissed me off directly, face to face. He’s not the kind of guy to deal with you face-to-face. So I guess that kind of says something about him. But there are certain people you can tell talk a bigger game than what ends up being the truth, so you start questioning the validity and the integrity of some of these people. And when they’re in charge of talent, that’s not always a good thing,” Paul London said.