Why Didn't Diamond Dallas Page and Goldberg Succeed in WWE? Matt Hardy Explains



by ATIA MUKHTAR

Why Didn't Diamond Dallas Page and Goldberg Succeed in WWE? Matt Hardy Explains
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In the ever-evolving landscape of professional wrestling, the transition of stars between promotions often comes with its unique challenges and controversies. This was notably evident during WWE's infamous Invasion storyline, where the integration of former WCW and ECW talents into Vince McMahon's WWE universe was met with mixed reactions and critiques.

The storyline, which aimed to blend the distinct worlds of these wrestling promotions, faced significant scrutiny for seemingly undermining the abilities and star power of WCW and ECW legends, such as Diamond Dallas Page (DDP) and Bill Goldberg.

Matt Hardy, a seasoned WWE superstar and a keen observer of the wrestling world, shed light on this contentious topic in a recent episode of "The Extreme Life of Matt Hardy." Hardy's insights delve into the heart of the issue: Vince McMahon's preference for talent groomed within the WWE system.

McMahon's pride in his creation, the unique WWE television product, often meant that stars from other promotions had to work harder to align with the WWE's distinct style and ethos.

Adapting to WWE Style

Hardy elaborates on the challenges faced by these WCW stars, emphasizing that adapting to the WWE's television style was a significant hurdle.

He recounts, "There were guys that came in, and they didn't necessarily work a WWE TV style, which Vince wanted to iron out. Regardless of their star status, adapting to the WWE way was crucial." This was a pivotal factor in the portrayal of these wrestlers within the WWE narrative.

A striking example of this clash of styles and storytelling is seen in DDP's controversial stalker storyline, where he fixated on The Undertaker's then-wife. This narrative sharply contrasted with DDP's image in WCW as a hard-working everyman who triumphed against odds, thus undermining his established character.

Similarly, Goldberg, known in WCW for his short, dominant matches, faced a challenge in WWE's preference for longer, more competitive bouts. Hardy notes, "Goldberg in WCW was all about quickly overpowering his opponents, but that wasn't the wrestling style promoted in WWE at the time." This stylistic discord may have contributed to Goldberg's relatively brief tenure in WWE post-2003.

These insights from Matt Hardy provide a deeper understanding of the complexities and intricacies involved in the crossover of wrestling talents between promotions. It underscores the importance of adaptability and the challenges of preserving a wrestler's core attributes in the face of changing narratives and styles within the dynamic world of professional wrestling.

Diamond Dallas Page Goldberg Matt Hardy